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A Northern Virginia Daily special anniversary section

Celebrating 75 years: Index of stories
* View anniversary slideshow

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Old news

Thursday, Sept. 15, 1932

  • Throngs of school children visited Woodstock for the Shenandoah County Fair.
  • Prosecution and defense rested in the trial of Kermit Orndorff for the murder of his wife, who was found dismembered in a "mountain grave," identified by a ring she was wearing and the color of her hair. In the next day's issue, it was reported tht Orndorff was found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to 38 years.
  • One-third of liquor law violators, a study revealed, were from eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bean, formerly of Toms Brook, but of Washington, D.C., at the time, celebrated their silver wedding anniversary.
In the Shenandoah Valley
  • Enrollment for the Warren County Schools on opening day was 858 -- with 110 first graders, the most ever.
  • The previous Sunday, Dr. Ernest H. Cherrington, who was general secretary of the World League Against Alcoholism, chairman of the National Prohibition Board of Strategy and director of the education department of the Anti-Saloon League of America, gave a "scholarly discussion" to a large crowd at Warren County High School's auditorium.
In the ads
  • Virginia Restaurant in Strasburg boasted that it offered fountain service, had all-new equipment and was the oldest established restaurant in the Shenandoah Valley.
  • S.G. Clark in Woodstock offered "valves ground," "carbon cleaned," and "new manifold gaskets" on a Model A Ford for only $3.95.
  • Five pounds of sugar at the A&P cost 23 cents.
In sports
  • Only one item was dedicated to sports. It appeared on the front page and reported that the Everett-Waddy baseball club defeated the Front Royal All-Stars. Members of the All-Stars listed in the article were: Manager George W. Riddick, Dalton Johnson, Lewis Jewitt, Edward Cassaroti, Lewin Eastham, Maurice Shirey, Frank Nesbit, Lacy McFall, Lyle McFall, Percy Hines, H.W. McCracand and "Coopy" Goodwin.

Tuesday, Sept. 15, 1942

Front page news
  • A large chart showed that tire life decreased as speeds driven increased. On it was a handwritten note from President Roosevelt to his White House secretary that asked him to put the chart "before the eyes and ears of all car drivers all over the country."
  • The Associated Press reported that a forest fire in southern Oregon might have been caused by what some suspected was the first air bombing of the continental United States by the Japanese.
In the Shenandoah Valley
  • Strasburg announced a new air raid signal so people could more easily distinguish it from a regular fire alarm.
In the ads
  • Retailers in the Shenandoah Valley said they would offer free war stamps with certain purchases on "Front Royal Stamp Day" as a show of support for the war effort.
  • These were the days before the TV page. Radio schedules were listed rather than TV schedules, with a Superman sketch at 5:30 p.m., the Glen Miller Orchestra at 7:15 p.m. and a Red Skelton comedy at 10:30 p.m.
  • Local theaters in Edinburg, Strasburg and New Market were showing "Sergeant York," starring Gary Cooper; "In This Our Life," starring Bette Davis and Olivia de Havilland; and "Tarzan's N.Y. Adventure," starring Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O'Sullivan.
In sports
  • One article was dedicated to sports: The Washington Senators beat the Detroit Tigers 8-6.
  • Monday, Sept. 15, 1952

    Front page news
    • Three escapees from the federal penitentiary at Lewisburg, Pa., were on the loose.
    • A California bandleader used a hatchet to defend his home against a would-be robber.
    • Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower began a 12-state tour seeking support as the GOP presidential nominee.
    In the Shenandoah Valley
    • Mrs. Portia Washington, the oldest and only living child of Booker T. Washington, spoke at the Front Royal Methodist Church, saying that "her race has made gains but needs to make many more."
    In the ads
    • A 100-pill bottle of St. Joseph aspirin was going for only 49 cents.
    In sports
    • The Edinburg baseball team defeated Mt. Jackson 4-3, under "hurler" Donnie Coffman.

    Saturday, Sept. 15, 1962

    Front page news
    • U.S. Sen. Mike Mansfield, of Montana, made a call for senators to close ranks behind President Kennedy's handling of the Cuban situation.
    • A Richmond circuit judge found two Virginia "anti-NAACP" laws unconstitutional.
    • The president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation wanted a boost in the auto license fee -- from its then $10 to a new level of $25 -- so there would be more funding for road projects.
    In the Shenandoah Valley
    • A Shenandoah County court fined two men $10 each for speeding. Two other men were charged the same amount for driving without an operator's license.
    In the ads
    • Subscriptions to The Northern Virginia Daily were offered at 25 cents per week.
    • The TV listings included showings of "Bugs Bunny," "Lassie," "What's My Line," "Lawrence Welk," "Ed Sullivan" and "Gunsmoke."
    • A Happy Days Sale at B&M Sales Co. in Winchester was offering two 1958 Chevys -- one for $895, down from $995 -- and the other for $995, down from $1,145. A 1955 Ford Sport Coupe was selling for $245, down from $395.
    In sports
    • Jim Casey debuted as the coach of the James Wood High School football team.

    Friday, Sept. 15, 1972

    Front page news
    • Girls boarded at Massanutten Military Academy for the first time.
    • High winds and rain interrupted electricity in Strasburg.
    • The North Vietnamese said they were willing to have another meeting with Henry A. Kissinger.
    In the Shenandoah Valley
    • A limited quarantine order was issued by the state veterinarian to guard against the spread of hog cholera.
    • The Rev. Frank Jennings, known as the "Hobo Minister," was slated to spend three weeks at the Woodstock Presbyterian Church. He was a world traveler and author of several books and was well known for having preached to "'people of the road,'" such as "tramps, circus people and gypsies."
    In the ads
    • Nichols Department Store in Winchester listed boxes of Kleenex four for $1.
    • A help wanted ad in the classified section called for "Beautiful Girls — to be burned alive at the Dr. Evil Stage Show" at the Park Theatre in Front Royal.
    • Premier week on ABC was highlighting the new season of "The Brady Bunch" at 8 p.m. followed by the new season of "The Partridge Family."
    In sports
    • Strasburg High School's junior varsity football team "outclassed" William Monroe's team 40-8. Bobby Funk scored the first points for the Rams.

    Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1982

    Front page news
    • Lebanon's president-elect Bashir Gemayel was killed in a Beirut bombing.
    • Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry "won the renomination that virtually guaranteed him a second term."
    • Michael Dukakis defeated Massachusetts Gov. Edward J. King in the primary elections, proclaiming his Democratic primary victory as "a defeat for Reaganomics."
    • Princess Grace of Monaco, 52, formerly known as Grace Kelly, died of a cerebral hemorrhage suffered in an auto accident.
    In the Shenandoah Valley
    • Two Winchester men were ordered held during a preliminary hearing. They were accused of abducting an employee of the Papermill Place restaurant.
    In the ads
    • An ad from Radio Shack in Woodstock consisted of a coupon for a "Super Mini Stereo Cassette Player" for $39.95. The regular price listed was $59.95.
    • An ad for Sears' 96th Anniversary Sale at all locations offered a Tablet"" and indicated that "Touch 'N Tune lets you jump instantly to your channel." The regular price was listed at $469.95.
    In sports
    • Warren County High School's Missy Myers scored a career record 32 points in a girls basketball game against Osbourn.
    • Cal Ripken's grand slam home run in the fifth inning of a game against the New York Yankees led the Baltimore Orioles to a 5-3 victory and a sweep of their doubleheader. The score of the first game was 5-4.

    Saturday, Sept. 14, 2002

    Front page news
    • A suspect in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was captured. Ramzi Binalshibh, one of America's "top terror targets" was captured in Pakistan, having been "suspected of helping to organize the Sept. 11 attacks overseas."
    • U.S. officials also arrested five men suspected of running a terrorist cell in the suburbs of Buffalo, N.Y. The men were of Yemeni descent, but most were believed to be American citizens.
    • The Florida elections board rejected Janet Reno's request for a recount in that state's gubernatorial primary.
    • U.S. Sen. John Warner, then 74, and others attended Winchester's third Hobnob in the Valley.
    • A Frederick County man was believed to have been the first from his county to have contracted the West Nile Virus.
    In the Shenandoah Valley
    • Sorley, a 34-year-old horse that belonged to Chuck and Paula Everett, was rescued by volunteers near Edinburg after falling into a pond.
    In the ads
    • Royal Cinemas in Front Royal was screening "The Country Bears," "The Bourne Identity," "Signs" and "Minority Report."
    • A townhouse in Woodstock, boasting two bedrooms, 11⁄2 baths, hardwood floors and a fully finished basement, was for sale for $82,000.
    In sports
    • With the help of kicker Brad Whitacre, Sherando beat Broad Run 25-6.

    More in this section:
    * View anniversary slideshow


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