Analysis: Area counties follow national polling trends

Warren County Electoral Board members Lee Bowen, left, and Bill Hammack canvass ballots from Tuesday's voting inside the Warren County Registrar's office in Front Royal on Wednesday. Rich Cooley/Daily

Warren County Electoral Board members Lee Bowen, left, and Bill Hammack canvass ballots from Tuesday's voting inside the Warren County Registrar's office in Front Royal on Wednesday. Rich Cooley/Daily

Poll analysis shows that Shenandoah, Warren and Frederick counties leaned heavily in favor of voting for President-elect Donald Trump on Tuesday.

According to unofficial ballot results from the Virginia Department of Elections, 69 percent of Shenandoah County voters opted for Trump, followed by 66 percent from Warren County and 65 percent from Frederick County.

In Winchester City, however, the town turned blue when 48 percent of its residents chose Democrat Hillary Clinton compared to 45 percent Trump.

These numbers hold their pattern trickling down the ballot toward the race for U.S. House of Representatives. In Virginia’s Sixth District (which includes Shenandoah and Warren counties), U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Roanoke, held off a challenge from Democrat Kai Degner.

In Shenandoah County, a 75 percent majority aligned itself with the incumbent, next to 70 percent from Warren County.

Likewise, in Virginia’s 10th Congressional District (which includes Winchester and Frederick counties), U.S. Rep. Barbara Comstock, R-McLean, fought off a challenge from Democrat LuAnn Bennett, of McLean, in a high-profile race that was fueled by donations from around the nation.

Just over 70 percent of Frederick County residents voted to keep Comstock in office. Winchester offered a much closer race, with the incumbent prevailing with 52 percent of the vote.

Although national voter turnout numbers are up from in years past, votes ebbed from the ballot for down-ticket races such as town council elections.

Middletown residents voted at the Cedar Creek precinct at Middletown Elementary School. From that poll, although 1,199 residents came out to choose a new president, only 1,255 votes were cast for the three open council seats. The ballot instructed residents to pick three candidates.

In averaging out the data, each Middletown voter who selected a presidential candidate picked 1.05 Town Council candidates of the three votes allowed.

In the election, incumbent council members George “Jay” Smith, Carole Snyder Jones and Carolyn Aliff kept their seats. They were challenged by Marshall “Mark” Brown and Gilbert “Gil” Barrington.

In Stephens City, which also had three seats open for council, voters behaved similarly. While 2,315 people showed up to vote for president, only 1,532 votes were cast for council, although voters were allowed to pick three.

To average out this data, everyone who showed up voted for two-thirds of one town council member out of the three votes allowed.

In the election, candidate Kelly Ann Thatcher and incumbents Ronald Bowers and Joseph Hollis won the three seats against Steven Happek.

Contact staff writer Jake Zuckerman at 540-465-5137 ext. 152, or jzuckerman@nvdaily.com.


Election results

Data presented in this article is preliminary until each county’s Board of Elections submits official results to the Virginia Department of Elections.

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