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Letters

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

Luke was a gentile. He was the first and only Gentile contributor to the New Testament. He was skilled in the Greek language, so much so that the implication is that he was not Jewish. He had been a physician to a Roman family who arranged to set him free and was given Roman citizenship. Luke was the author of a stunning Gospel and a contributor to Acts. He remained unmarried, and died at age 84.
My early Bible training was in 1940 at Ouachita Baptist U. (spelled with an “O”, not a “G”). My teacher was Dr. Lowell Wallace. I suggested that Scriptures in all bible Books should have an outline form divided into parts. All parts interspersed between change of thought should be capitalized. Then at the University of California in 1947, I had a wonderful encounter with Dr. Edgar Goodspeed, a member of a committee to work on the revised edition of the Holy Bible. He thought an idea of a built-in outline with capitalized parts was worth talking about.
In Luke, Part 1 is an introduction of the son of man (1:1-4:13); Part 2, the ministry of the son of man (4:14-9:50); Part 3, the rejection of the son (9:51-19:27) and the instruction in view of Christ’s rejection (12:1-19:27); Part 4, the crucifixion and resurrection (19:28-24:53). Christ appears to the 11 and the ascension is given.

JAMES D. TANKERSLEY
P.O. BOX 176
Maurertown
July 2, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

Our office is awarding $50,000 for foreclosure relief counseling for Virginia families that are in danger of losing their homes to foreclosure. These grant funds are from a settlement in January with Countrywide Financial Corp. that addressed alleged deceptive acts and practices with Countrywide’s mortgage activities in Virginia.
Under the court-approved settlement, $50,000 was set aside for foreclosure education. This contribution will fund grants to nonprofit counseling agencies and is projected to benefit about 200 Virginia families facing foreclosure.
In this difficult economic climate, an unprecedented number of families are struggling to make ends meet. I am pleased that these funds from the Countrywide settlement will provide a real benefit to Virginia families in danger of losing their homes to foreclosure.
The donation will supplement funds allocated by the Virginia Housing Development Authority and the Department of Housing and Community Development. VHDA will administer the grant program.
Our office advises Virginians to stay observant and cautious in order to avoid potential foreclosure relief scams. For example, recently some families have lost homes due to a false belief that the mortgage counselors they are working with are connected to the government, when in fact, that is not the case. It is recommended to work only with a certified housing counselor.
To search for a certified housing counselor, and learn more about laws and homeowners’ rights, visit the governor’s foreclosure prevention Web site, www.virginia foreclosureprevention.com.
Preventing foreclosure isn’t achieved solely by the mortgage lenders or the counselors, but also by Virginians who decide to take control of their finances and reconcile potential issues, particularly staying in communication with lenders and managing spending responsibly. Foreclosures can best be prevented when homeowners and lenders are aware of the problems and jointly seek solutions.

BILL MIMS
Attorney General
900 E. Main St.
Richmond
July 7, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

In answer to Col. Gordon’s (letter, July 8 issue) first concern regarding Obama’s critics becoming more vocal and mean-spirited I simply say this:
This is still a republic governed by the Bill of Rights. The First Amendment still rules in this country and we will continue to exercise our free-speech rights.
In response to the colonel’s next statement about the minority leader, Rep. Boehner (R Ohio). I listen to his comments and at no time did he ever sound as the colonel put it, “almost hysterical” and he most certainly did not speak with a shrill voice. What he did do was try to inform his fellow members in Congress and the American people just what was in that 1,300-plus-page bill that no one could’ve read in the time allotted.
Thankfully, some of us do record and watch C-SPAN so we can refute people like the colonel. He did correctly guess one thing right. Sitting behind Rep. Boehner was our Congressman Frank Wolf, who I might add had the common sense to vote against the energy bill.
Col. Gordon wants us to get behind our president and support him. Support him how? Shall we support him every time he makes excuses for America’s being great? Shall we support him when he tries to rise up a civilian police force answerable only to him? Or every time he wants a bill passed that will heap trillions of dollars worth of debt on our future generations? Shall we support him and his move to “fundamentally” change the direction of this country from a republic to a European socialist-style country?
No, Col. Gordon, we shall do none of these things. For as long as President Obama continues to move this country in a direction that is away from what our founding fathers intended we shall reject everything that Obama pushes and we shall instead embrace the ideas and principles of our founding fathers and our Constitution.

Tim Ratigan
324 W. 10th St.
Front Royal
July 8, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

You know what? I’ll bet that I’m going to sleep better at night knowing that the town of Woodstock is considering codifying a code of ethics.
The proposed code is supposedly being developed to offer guidelines for proper behavior and prescribe directions to personnel on their responsibility to the public that they deal with every day. According to the town manager, when completed and approved, the code should be posted in the town government building for employees and elected officials to remind themselves of the civil obligation they owe to the people who elected them and pay their salaries.
I guess what bothers me the most about this is that public employees and elected officials should already know what constitutes proper conduct and what obligations they have to people doing business with the town. And clearly they ought to have some sense of what is ethical behavior if they hold responsible positions and ask for the public’s trust.
These simple things used to be taught by parents and churches and regulated by individual consciences. It should be axiomatic that we deem a person of worth and value because of his personhood and nothing else. I suppose it is a sign of the times that we feel compelled to remind ourselves by posting guidelines on how to treat our fellow man.
Each year after the legislature leaves Richmond the volumes of the code of Virginia become larger. Our nation was founded with the understanding that people would do the right thing by conscience, not because they are compelled to by law. The fact that there are so many laws speaks volumes about our conduct as a society.
It is probably not a bad thing, though, to have a code of ethics among government employees and elected officials in Woodstock. Sadly, it has taken this long. The town has been in business more than 235 years.

L. Stephen Jennings
713 W. Spring St.
Woodstock
July 7, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

Fourth of July has come and gone in Woodstock without any fireworks, parade or community celebration. It is sad that the county seat has little patriotism, even though we now have two statues of Peter Muhlenberg. Surely, some enhancement funds could go towards fireworks. What is the money being used for from our auto tax of $25 per year?
Woodstock has been my home for the past 24 years and I am proud to be a resident here. However, it disappoints me that we no longer have Court Days, parades (other than Christmas in the dark of night) or any other community events except the yard crawl.
Many other residents will support me in saying it was a disgrace to chop down the beautiful trees in front of the old courthouse.
Soon we will not have to worry about lack of interest in downtown Woodstock because many will have gone to neighboring towns for celebrations and events.

ROBERT M. TAYLOR
523 W. Spring St.
Woodstock
July 7, 2009