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Letters

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

Regarding Karen Hill’s letter (July 10 issue):
The war machinery I refer to is also called the “military-industrial complex.” It is now composed primarily of several huge corporations that provide goods and services to the Pentagon.
The U.S. owns 11 aircraft carriers at a cost of $45 billion each, a yearly operating cost of $160 million — that’s $438,356 per day each. We have in service 89,129 military aircraft with an additional 29,700 helicopters, all needing fuel and maintenance. There are 8,800 tanks, depending on whose numbers you believe. All have parts that wear out. All required research, development, testing, upgrading, transportation costs and yearly makeovers.
America claims 737 military bases worldwide, but that number rises well past 1,000 when secret bases are taken into account. They had to be built, maintained, people fed and clothed (military), provided computers, desks and pencils. Regarding the secret bases: prison hardware, “interrogation facilities,” electricity and water, heating and cooling (for the interrogators).
Approximately 1,840,062 U.S. military personal worldwide make up the manpower of the above machinery. All must be fed, housed, clothed, transported, educated, trained, and some require bullets. Tomahawk missiles at $1.5 million each require expensive launchers. The research and development of weaponry alone is in the billions.
The electronic aspects are staggering, with NORAD and Global Hawk technology fed into several million computers and defense mechanisms. Infra-red gizmos and gadgets adorn our soldiers’ lives in varying aspects, and then there are radar facilities and satellite manufacturing. A variety of simulators for a variety of training needs.
There are corporations that, like General Electric, have shifted entirely to the needs of the defense industry. Halliburton and Northrop are household words, and during the Bush years, privatization of military supplies increased.
World peace would bring this manufacturing to an abrupt end, irritating corporate interests.
If all this “defense” is designed to keep us safe, 24/7, under most any variant an enemy could possibly dream up, I have only one question, Ms. Hill:
Where was this defense industry for two hours on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001?

Roy A. Stokes
687 Woodville Road
Maurertown
July 14, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

As Congress is trying to rush a 1,000-plus-page complex health-care bill for a vote by the August recess, it does not matter what your political affiliation is: You should be concerned.
How can any of our representatives with a straight face say they have fully evaluated and understand the pros and cons of this complex legislation in such a short period of time? The House bill just came out of committee this past week.
There are a few tidbits of information about the bill that have come out that should make every Virginian concerned. On page 16 of the House bill, it states that any changes in your insurance contract, such as marriage status, after the law is initiated will require you to move into a “qualified” plan (as determined by the government) instead of keeping your plan.
To pay for the $1.5 trillion bill, which, by the way, does not cover all uninsured as was proposed by the president, “savings in Medicare” in the amount of $500 billion will be made by reducing inefficiencies, waste and fraud. If you are a senior, guess where those savings ultimately will come from? The only place the government can really cut costs: your benefits.
Finally, just this past week the Congressional Budget Office stated in a House committee meeting that the bill as proposed/organized will not cut costs as Congress promised, but in fact will increase the budget deficit.
There are many more questionable aspects of this bill, but if it is rushed through into law, it will be too late to protect your medical care.
If you feel that the health-care bill is not being fully vetted and you do not want the federal government to control your health care, you need to contact our senators (Warner and Webb) and representative to express your feelings.

ERNIE GRISDALE
615 Cobb Court
Woodstock
July 20, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

Those of you who have read “Atlas Shrugged” by Ayn Rand are familiar with the terms “looters” and “moochers.” For the uninitiated, modern-day looters are represented by corrupt politicians, greedy bank presidents, CEOs and union thugs who are looking for a “quick kill.”
If moochers doesn’t ring a bell, you haven’t been paying attention for the past 50 years. They are the whiners who constantly set us against each other for their own gain. They are the race baiters, the socialists, the Marxists, the political advisers, the PACs, the special-interest groups and the people who grant privileges to one group while ignoring all the others. They are the leeches we are now trying to fend off.
They use the age-old tactic of “divide and conquer” to tyrannize. In their arrogance, they condescend and speak to you as if you were an infant. This is the same arrogance and condescension foisted on the colonies by the English king in 1775. The aristocracy, the Tories, House of Lords (Senate) and House of Commons (House) are alive and well in the USA.
The looters and moochers have the productive middle class in a vise and they are squeezing. Their attempt to run you out of options with “cap and trade,” universal health care, the end of the secret ballot and Stimulus I and II will provide them the opportunity to further corrupt the system. In essence, the middle class is being mugged, pillaged and raped in broad daylight.
There are those who will tell you it is all for “the common good’ (sounds like socialism to me), implying that the “state” is more important than the individual. In the USA, it doesn’t take “a village” unless you are irresponsible. The individual working alone made this country. Their ideas and initiative are what made us — not committees, boards of directors, institutes, nor universities.
Wake up and smell the odorous, noxious nature of our government before you are sending your entire paycheck to the state for redistribution based on your worth to the state. We need a sustained boycott by the producers.

JOHN W. LACAVA
23 Murchison Lane
Luray
July 17, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

Regarding Phyllis Fravel’s letter (July 10 issue), to this I say, Amen. Right on, Phyllis.
There is a broad road that leads to destruction and a narrow road that leads to the way of righteousness. See Matthew 7:13-14.
Our nation has been speeding down this broad road and has picked up much speed since Jan. 20, 2009.
America needs to awake and get this nation on the right road. God accepts “U” turns. We need to do it now.

RANDOLPH FOLTZ
14149 S. Middle Road
Edinburg
July 20, 2009
Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

We, the readers of this good newspaper, are savvy enough to understand our need for health-care reform and to recognize the time is here to finally get security against accidents and illnesses.
But I am certain many Republicans, those who are wishing President Obama — thus ourselves — to fail, may one day regret being the worst things we Americans have to overcome.
It falls to us, Joe-plain-citizens, to speak for ourselves, to rush to judgment with President Obama in getting our protection: the health-care plan with the public option, described clearly online, by Googling “Health Care Reform Action Center.” Read the three core issues given at that site, fellow Virginians, and call our senators and representatives, even the ones who have turned their backs on us.
We need to teach them that we still know how to stand together for our own good.

Deon L. Jaccard
264 N. River Drive
Woodstock
July 23, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

This is a campaign season and for some reason the GOP ticket wants to talk about everything but their record. Perhaps Bob McDonnell doesn’t want it noticed that he actually opposed federal funds dedicated to extending unemployment benefits in Virginia in this current recession when thousands of our neighbors could use the help.
It seems that only Creigh Deeds, Jody Wagner and Steve Shannon want to talk about their record in support of bipartisan and common-sense accomplishments of Mark Warner and Tim Kaine. Their opponents want to talk about hot-button issues before Congress, make allegations about Gov. Kaine and act like problems Virginia is having in this economy are unique.
Eight years ago, Virginia was in a big fiscal hole dug by Jim Gilmore. When Mark Warner tried to dig us out, guess who was against him every step of the way: Bob McDonnell, Bill Bolling and Ken Cuccinelli. When Mark Warner and Tim Kaine proposed transportation initiatives, the opposition was the same.
The ticket of Creigh Deeds, Jody Wagner and Steve Shannon has an agenda to continue common-sense policies both parties can agree on. They want Virginia to keep its reputation for being friendly to business and well-managed.
Politicians can say what they want when they want our vote, but I remember who stood up for common sense and bipartisanship all along. I also support policies that help Virginia attract business and create jobs. Therefore I support the candidates with a record to back up their claims: Creigh Deeds for governor, Jody Wagner for lieutenant governor and Steve Shannon for attorney general.

Eric D. Olson
1571 Blue Mountain Road
Front Royal
July 20, 2009