/usr/web/www.nvdaily.com/wp-content/themes/coreV2/single.php

Letters

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

We are quickly heading for an environmental train wreck that will profoundly impact us all. The time is now to pass strong clean energy jobs legislation that will stabilize our economy and lay the groundwork for America to be competitive in the 21st century. The combined economic and climate crises require urgent action and Americans across the nation share a vision for a clean energy future.
The energy bill that recently passed the House of Representatives was weakened by industry lobbyists and repeals the part of the Clean Air Act that limits global warming pollution from existing power plants. A recent New York Times editorial argued, “The older, dirtiest [coal] plants … simply cannot be let off the hook.” The Senate must close damaging loopholes in the energy bill.
To get the economy going again, our state needs more solar collectors and windmills, not more smokestacks. According to a University of Massachusetts study, solar and wind create twice as many jobs as coal. More coal-fired power plants simply mean fewer clean energy jobs.
We must get behind our senators to strengthen the energy bill and save the Clean Air Act. We need the jobs and we need clean air.
Some think seeking big changes is risky. But the political climate is more favorable now than it has ever been, and our senators should be strongly encouraged not settle for half-measures.

Katharine F. Layton
149 Louie’s Lane
Fort Valley
July 30, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

Rather than admit the Catholic Church did not support Hitler, Gene Rigelon castigated me. Some heroic individuals helped the Jews. Only the Catholic Church recognized what was happening, so priests, nuns and laymen helped them escape the camps by hiding them in convents, churches, monasteries, schools and private homes and giving them papers (baptismal certificates and Vatican passes). Because of all Pius XII did for them, the chief rabbi of Rome became Catholic after the war.
Yes, James Tankersley, Luke was a gentile. As Paul converted from Judaism to Catholicism, so Luke converted also. He was still the best educated of the gospel writers. Like Gene, James also begs the question. Christmas in December was not invented by some mistaken Catholic monk. The first written Bible was put on paper by St. Jerome. He was no monk and Christmas in December was no mistake.
What credibility do quotes from James’ teachers have since the Anabaptists, now know as Baptists, were founded by a fallen-away Catholic priest who wanted to do things his way, not Christ’s way. The Bible says the Catholic Church was founded by Christ to save souls. “Thou art Peter. Upon this rock I will build my church. The gates of hell will not prevail against it.”
John Henry Newman, a leader of the Oxford movement in the 1800s, said, “One who is steeped in history is no longer a Protestant.” He converted to Catholicism and later became a cardinal.
I suggest both Gene and James read the early fathers of the church. Check the succession from Peter to Benedict. Think about what they believe.
God gives the gift of faith to everyone. Accept it, Gene. There is a heaven. If I make it there, I hope to meet the both of you.

ILLEEN RENINGER
20 Gloucester Road
Front Royal
July 28, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

The health-care debate draws the attention of many, if not most, of us. It should. There is nearly unanimous agreement that reform in this field is long overdue. Agreement on that score has been growing since the days of Harry Truman. For what its worth, much of the industrialized world has had some form of universal health care, including that provided by the old creeping socialist Emperor Franz Joseph, since before the First World War.
In these circumstances one might think there would be some grand united effort to achieve this goal. Any such notion fails to reckon with (1) the complexity of the subject and (2) politics.
We have some leftish liberals insisting that only a government-run plan will do. Then there’s the leader of the right wing, Sen. Jim DeMint of South Carolina, who candidly states that his main interest in the health-care issue is to use it as a weapon to destroy Barack Obama.
What’s the ordinary person to do when faced with these extremes? A start is to forget the propaganda of the rabble-rousers, the nay-sayers (and the insurance companies). Try to (1) identify what needs to be done and (2) figure out what to do about it. Realize that no approach to so vast a subject will fully satisfy anyone. Weigh the consequences of proposals personally, as well as on the general populace of our nation, including the tens of millions without any health coverage. Accept the fact that any comprehensive solution will cost everyone, as well as the interests, something.
The job facing us is no piece of cake. Disregard the preachers of paradise or perdition. Make a judgment, based at least in part, on the consensus of moderates in both parties who are devoted to finding a reasonable answer to a critical problem that touches each of us. We can’t let this opportunity slip away.

Bob Lowerre
403 Spring Hollow Road
Woodstock
July 31, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

I read an AP story this morning that proclaimed “Obama officials say taxes may rise to pay for health care.” No, really? Say it ain’t so. Who would ever have thought that the government could pay a $1.6 trillion dollar (using current estimates) tab without raising taxes? Who would be so utterly stupid to make this assumption? How about all the people who voted for Mr. Obama? At least Clinton had the decency to give us the bad news in the first few weeks of his presidency.
You want a single-payer system, go to Canada. Don’t take away my liberty to satisfy your warped sense of entitlement.
People screamed about the rampant spending by Congress during the Bush administration. That pales in comparison to what we are seeing from the current Congress.
Where are those people now? Why aren’t they screaming even more loudly? Because the big mean producers, the people who make this country run, are being taxed into oblivion. The consumers, people who do nothing, are circling like vultures and rabid hyenas, waiting to get at the leftover carcass of the middle class that the government is picking clean.
What they don’t know is that there won’t be anything left when the government is finished. Who is going to satisfy their lust for the benefit of someone else’s labor when the government has crushed the producing class in this country?
All of you who voted for what you see happening now better get what you can while you can. Soon enough the feeding frenzy will be all over and you will have your wish. You will have your share of the booty, however meager it may be.
But don’t expect any more after that. Much like the carcass of a beast on the plains of Africa, once consumed it will produce no more sustenance. You’ll be left sitting back on your fat gluteus wondering where your next meal is coming from. Are you ready for that?

James E. Irre
221 Lower Valley Road
Strasburg
Aug. 3, 2009

Editor
Northern Virginia Daily

Sir:

As a single-payer system, Medicare has covered 80 percent of my health-care expenses for 20 years. My employer’s supplemental plan pays the rest plus offers prescription coverage. The annual cost to me, including co-pays, is now $5,577. The cost has, over the years, increased considerably more than the corresponding consumer price index. Still I have peace of mind. Overall, I am well covered and well served.
Many fellow citizens are not so lucky. Some 45 million have no coverage at all and many more are under-insured. When a health-care crisis arises, their only option is “free” hospital emergency care, which drives up the cost for us all.
Other than this unnecessary increase to me (and you), I could easily be unconcerned about this issue and have no interest in its outcome. For many important reasons, I am concerned — as all should be.
A health-care system is judged by the overall well-being of all its citizens. Despite our superior facilities of all the advanced nations our system is the most expensive and least effective, mainly because so many people have no up-front care.
Moreover, our health care is primarily geared toward treatment rather than prevention — all at great cost to the nation (as well as its citizens), making us less economically competitive and straining our national budget. As a result, many are suffering financially as well as physically and the situation continues to worsen exponentially. If this trend continues, we will soon become a second-class nation.
Entrenched special health-care interests are already seeking to convince us that we should “tell Congress” to retain the status quo — that’s where all their profits reside. Using a strategy of fear, so successful in the past, they seek to have us believe that the government will take charge of our health-care lives, even determining when we live and die (not true).
The real truth is that the insurance companies , when denying coverage, are the ones that are making that determination.
An old saw: “Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me.” It’s time we stop being fooled.

Thomas M. Harrison
914 Fairground Road
Front Royal
Aug. 3, 2009