Syndicated Columnists

Peter Brookes: Nuke deal doesn’t mean Iran troubles are over

Peter Brookes

July 2, 2015

With the deadline pushed off until Tuesday, I’m betting that an Iran nuke deal actually will be trumpeted over the July 4 holiday weekend, since the best time to put out controversial news in Washington, D.C., is near or over a break.

Kathleen Parker: Michelle Obama’s evolution

Kathleen Parker

July 1, 2015

WASHINGTON — First-term first ladies are often shadows to their more-important husbands, dabbling in lite fare to avoid criticism and picking safe projects to shield them and their families from the inevitable slings and arrows.

Diane Dimond: Deny, deny until they die

Diane Dimond

June 30, 2015

So, the U.S. government has finally decided to help some 2,000 Air Force personnel exposed to Agent Orange residue left over in airplanes used during the Vietnam War. They are now eligible for disability, medical and survivor benefits.

Froma Harrop: President Obama’s lonely road

Froma Harrop

June 30, 2015

Americans were perilously close to losing their right to health care when the Supreme Court offered a reprieve. Few were more grateful than the conservative politicians who had been railing against the Affordable Care Act while praying they would not have to face the political consequences of its collapse.

Mark Shields: Politics, religion: An uneasy coexistence

Mark Shields

June 29, 2015

Regular readers may remember the “Shields rule,” about the tension between organized religion and politics. It goes like this: With but one exception, ministers, priests, rabbis and imams — men and women of the cloth — should stay out of all partisan American politics. The one exception, of course, is any major political fight in which the minister, priest, rabbi or imam courageously dares to support my candidate or to join my side.

In South, grace, dignity after church shootings

Jonah Goldberg

June 29, 2015

“Lots of folks expected us to do something strange and break out in a riot. Well, they just don’t know us,” the Rev. Norvel Goff told the packed, multiracial congregation of Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., on Sunday. It was the first service since the horrific slaughter of nine innocent souls by a racist fanatic.

Scott Rasmussen: States don’t have rights, people have rights

Scott Rasmussen

June 28, 2015

This week, we’ll be celebrating the 239th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The eloquent cries for freedom and equality voiced in that properly revered document have become what professors Sid Milkis and Marc Landy call the “American Creed.” It’s a belief that all of us have the right to do whatever we want with our lives so long as we don’t interfere with the right of others to do the same.

George F. Will: Questions for candidate Clinton

George F. Will

June 28, 2015

WASHINGTON — Hillary Clinton’s reticence is drowning out her message, which is that she is the cure for the many ailments that afflict America during a second Democratic presidential term. Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., has called her “the most opaque person you’ll ever meet in your life,” but when opacity yields to the necessity of answering questions, here are a few:

Leonard Pitts Jr.: In denial of the truth

Leonard Pitts Jr.

June 26, 2015

This is for Elisabeth Hasselbeck of “Fox & Friends,” who described last Thursday’s act of white extremist terrorism at Emanuel AME church in Charleston as an “attack on faith.”

Froma Harrop: America: A nation of stressed-out worker bees

Froma Harrop

June 26, 2015

We ambitious strivers seeking guidance from fitness pros, decluttering experts and TED talks often find the day divided in two unequal parts. Three-quarters goes to overworking. The remaining quarter is for countering the ill effects of overworking. We do the latter not necessarily to nurture our souls but to boost performance during the working hours.

Connie Schultz: The demise of a symbol

Connie-Schultz-c

June 25, 2015

On the evening of June 17, nine black Americans were killed in their Charleston, South Carolina, church by a white supremacist — but only after he’d spent an hour with them praying and studying the Bible.

Kathleen Parker: A time to grieve

Kathleen Parker

June 23, 2015

WASHINGTON — Unspeakable, unimaginable, incomprehensible and unthinkable are the words we’ve heard and used to describe the horrific murders of nine African-Americans as they prayed in a Charleston, South Carolina, church, shot by a hate-filled racist on a genocidal purge.

Mona Charen: Hands off the $10 Alexander Hamilton

Mona Charen

June 22, 2015

They’re coming for our money. OK, that’s nothing new, but this time, the Obama administration is coming for our $10 bills — the notes graced by the image of Alexander Hamilton. True to the identity politics of the Democratic Party, the Obama Treasury Department has announced that some worthy female will replace Hamilton on the currency.

Leonard Pitts Jr.: No sanctuary in America

Leonard Pitts Jr.

June 22, 2015

The main hall of a church is called a sanctuary. It is where you go to worship, to seek fellowship and solace, and commune with your maker. The dictionary definition of the word adds an additional layer of resonance. A sanctuary is where you are sheltered and protected. A sanctuary is where you are safe.

Mark Shields: Marco Rubio vs. The New York Times

Mark Shields

June 21, 2015

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. — who, according to polls of Republican voters nationally, wins higher favorable and lower unfavorable ratings than any of the potential 2016 presidential candidates — has shown some real nerve and more than a little brass.

Scott Rasmussen: A ray of hope far from Washington

Scott Rasmussen

June 21, 2015

Listening to the political junkies discuss the 2016 presidential election more than a year ahead of time is enough to depress just about anyone who has a life outside the political bubble. It will get even worse next year with the avalanche of civic pollution known as campaign commercials.