Columnists

Froma Harrop: Oil Has a Price. Wildlife? Priceless

The Bible tells how Esau sold his birthright for a "mess of pottage." It is a lesson on the foolishness of choosing immediate gratification over something of far more value but in the future. Esau, in sum, traded his right to be recognized as the firstborn son -- with all the advantages his ...

Robert B. Reich: Patriotism, taxes and Trump

Selling the Donald Trump/Republican tax plan should be awkward for an administration that has made patriotism its central theme. That's because patriotism isn't mostly about saluting the flag and standing during the national anthem. It's about taking a fair share of the burden of keeping ...

Mark Shields: First ‘pre-mortem’ of 2018 elections

American voters, almost invariably dissatisfied with the political status quo, generally endorse change. In 2016, Donald Trump was certainly the candidate of change, and Hillary Clinton, seeking a third consecutive Democratic term in the White House, represented continuity. Voters' enthusiasm ...

Kathleen Parker: Looking back at Election Day 2016

WASHINGTON -- 'Tis the season of looking back, which brings us inevitably to Election Day 2016. Donald Trump's victory places last year as one of the most significant in modern American history. Not only did he change how politics is played, but he probably destroyed the Republican Party as we ...

Andy Schmookler: The power of the spirit

Something reminded me recently of when I first saw how America’s secular culture greatly underestimates the potential power of the spirit. It was at the beginning of the 1980s, when I was working in Washington on American national security. The overthrow of the Shah of Iran by the Ayatollah ...

Jules Witcover: Good thing Brazile’s scheme never came to pass

WASHINGTON -- You may think politics in Washington is beyond the pale now. But imagine if Donna Brazile, the former interim chair of the Democratic National Committee, had followed through on her notion of removing Hillary Clinton as the party's presidential nominee in 2016 and replacing her ...

Rich Lowry: In Texas, two very American heroes

Before the Texas church shooter encountered any police officers, he was run off a highway and dead. He had been shot and chased by two private citizens who took it upon themselves to respond to a heinous crime when no one with a badge was anywhere to be found. The church shooting in ...

Leonard Pitts Jr. Why are we OK with mass shootings?

I hate mass shootings. Everybody hates them, of course: innocent death, fathers, fiances, best friends, and sons snatched violently away, sudden carnage crashing ordinary days. But I hate them for an additional reason. When things like this happen, you see, it's my job to have something to ...

Froma Harrop: From real estate to the presidency and back

In Hawaii, "aloha" also means "goodbye." President Trump could not have missed the less-than-enthusiastic greeting during his brief touchdown in the U.S. state where -- facts are facts -- Barack Obama was born. Demonstrators there seemed to be following a new pattern among Trump foes, replacing ...

Jonah Goldberg: Could it be that both parties are doomed?

For all the obvious reasons, the Republican Party gets most of the attention these days. For starters, it controls the White House, the Senate and the House, and the party in power always warrants more scrutiny, even when it's operating smoothly. Of course, that's not happening. The GOP is ...

Diane Dimond: How many Tyra Pattersons are there?

It's one of those criminal cases that makes you shake your head in disbelief. Within a few weeks, 42-year-old Tyra Patterson will be released from an Ohio prison after serving 23 years for a murder she is now widely believed not to have committed. She will have spent more than half her life ...

Connie Schultz: Once falsely incarcerated, now a police academy graduate

In the fall of 2001, Michael Green walked out of prison after serving 13 years for a crime he did not commit. The story of his wrongful conviction is, in its particulars, an all-too-familiar one in America. He was accused by a white woman who had never seen a black man until she came to the ...

Mark Shields: Great presidents enjoy politics

On the consensus list of the most significant American presidents following George Washington, there is a common trait. Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Teddy Roosevelt, Thomas Jefferson and Harry Truman -- each of these great leaders was first a very good politician who actually enjoyed ...

Kathleen Parker: A quarter-century of Clintons

WASHINGTON -- Twenty-five years ago on Nov. 3, 1992, William Jefferson Clinton was elected president of the United States -- and Hillary Clinton is still trying to take his place. As historians and pundits recall his third-way presidency, another slice of his legacy can't be ignored -- the ...

Walter E. Williams: Let’s help our media friends

I am not nearly so coldhearted and unsympathetic toward the mainstream media as some of my conservative friends, such as Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, Sean Hannity, Tucker Carlson, Chris Plante and Ann Coulter. In fact, my heart goes out to them. As evidence of the same, if I had President Donald ...

Jules Witcover: Trump’s strategy no match to Mueller’s

WASHINGTON -- Special Counsel Robert Mueller's 12-point indictment of former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and Trump campaign official Rick Gates is the first significant development in the case in the investigation of alleged collusion with Russia as that country's government meddled in ...

Jonah Goldberg: Legalization isn’t the solution to the opioid crisis

One painful aspect of the public debates over the opioid-addiction crisis is how much they mirror the arguments that arise from personal addiction crises. If you've ever had a loved one struggle with drugs -- in my case, my late brother, Josh -- the national exercise in guilt-driven ...

George F. Will: On tax reform, Republicans define victory down

WASHINGTON -- Needing a victory to validate their majorities, congressional Republicans have chosen not to emulate Shakespeare's Henry V before Agincourt. He advocated stiffening the sinews, summoning up the blood and lending the eye a terrible aspect. The Republicans would rather define ...

Star Parker: Free tax code from special interests

A big tax bill is all it takes to see how perverse and dysfunctional our government has become. Why are the halls of Congress now crawling with special interest lobbyists looking for opportunities to carve out some new benefit, or to protect existing special interests in the tax code? The ...