Columnists

Leonard Pitts Jr.: Believers of Ernst hoax say a lot about who we are

"Unbelievably sad." That was the subject line of an email a colleague sent me last week. In it, she forwarded a link to a story that had Iowa Republican Sen. Joni Ernst telling a Des Moines radio host that Congress should outlaw vaccines because they "manipulate brains." According to the ...

Connie Schultz: Hit the road, Hillary

In my wildest dreams, I would never suggest campaign strategy to Hillary Clinton, but in my wakeful hours, my temples pulse with ideas. For a while, I've thought it best to keep my thoughts to myself, but that was before I started seeing all kinds of advice coming from people who never wait ...

Froma Harrop: Dignity not cheap for actresses

Lupita Nyong'o picked up an Oscar last year for her searing portrayal of a scarred captive in "12 Years a Slave." But many in the Academy Awards audience -- just reminded of the misery depicted in a film clip -- must have felt a bit mixed up when the woman they associated with a tormented slave ...

Peter Brookes: ISIS problem continues to spread

The White House is hosting a multi-day summit this week in Washington on the subject of "Countering Violent Extremism" at home and abroad. Can you say: "It's about time"? While there has been plenty gnashing of teeth about the absence of "Islamist" from the confab's title, let's hope that ...

Jonah Goldberg: Silly denials of Islamic terrorism bring a silver lining

"Could this argument be any dumber?" That's how I began a column over a month ago in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attacks. My point was that by making it an ideological priority to deny the Islamic nature of Islamic terrorism, the White House was in fact encouraging people to talk more ...

Robert B. Reich: How trade deals boost the rich and bust the rest of us

Suppose that by enacting a particular law we'd increase the U.S. gross domestic product. But almost all of that growth would go to the richest 1 percent. The rest of us could buy some products cheaper than before. But those gains would be offset by losses of jobs and wages. This is pretty ...

Diane Dimond: The 9-11 system needs some help

Each day across this country, lives are saved because a dedicated 9-11 operator dispatched emergency personnel to help a panicked person. Every year there are some 240 million urgent calls made to this "one nation, one number" system. The value of the 9-11 organization is beyond ...

By Scott Rasmussen: There’s more to life than just politics

Recently, while responding to a question about how to get young people involved in politics, President Obama expressed fears that they see politics as a "sideshow in Washington" and should be taught that "government is not something separate from you -- it is you." Young people need to ...

Jonah Goldberg: Conservatives face bad-faith question of faith

At an event in London on trade policy, Scott Walker was asked about evolution. "It's almost a tradition now," the moderator said, to ask "senior Republicans" if they are "comfortable with the idea of evolution." "I'm going to punt on that one as well," the Wisconsin governor replied. "That's ...

Froma Harrop: The why of weak consumer spending

A new report on consumer spending shows that consumers are not spending. Economists thought that the savings from cheaper gasoline -- hundreds of dollars a year for most -- would be hauled to the stores. But non-gasoline retail spending didn't budge last month, flat after falling a bit in ...

Robert B. Reich: Back to the 19th century

My recent column about the growth of on-demand jobs like Uber making life less predictable and secure for workers unleashed a small barrage of criticism from people who contend that workers get what they're worth in the market. A Forbes Magazine contributor, for example, writes that jobs ...

Mark Shields: Sleaze in a $5,000 suit

When he was secretary of state, Henry Kissinger was often -- and deliberately -- seen in the company of attractive actresses, including Jill St. John and Candice Bergen. Kissinger, whom nobody ever accused of being a matinee idol physically, offered this explanation for his seeming appeal to ...

Leonard Pitts: Judge Roy Moore stands on the wrong side of history…again

In June, it will be 52 years since George Wallace stood in the schoolhouse door. It happened at the University of Alabama, where two African-American students, Vivian Malone and James Hood, were attempting to register. In facing down three federal officials demanding that he stand aside and ...

Kathleen Parker: Why focus on slain students’ religion?

As soon as the news broke Tuesday evening, anyone near a TV, radio or computer heard that three Muslim students were murdered near the University of North Carolina. My immediate thought was, "Oh, my God, not Muslims." That very same day, we had gotten confirmation that 26-year-old ...

John Kass: Embattled Brian Williams, Hillary Clinton should swap war stories

If this NBC news anchor thing doesn't work out for Brian Williams, I've got the perfect job for the guy: Hillary Clinton's press secretary. Or better yet, as the New Commander McBragg. The problem is that Commander McBragg is a cartoon character from the old Tennessee Tuxedo cartoon ...

Connie Schultz: Why I’m pulling for Brian Williams

Newsrooms are snake pits. I say this with great affection. Newsrooms are tribal and competitive, fueling pettiness in the most honorable people. Editors cling to turfs like dictators policing their borders, and sometimes they mistake intimidation for management. As for reporters, they make ...

George Will: The Pence paradox

Although he is always preternaturally placid, Mike Pence today exemplifies a Republican conundrum. Sitting recently 24 blocks from Capitol Hill, where he served six terms as a congressman, and eight blocks from the White House, which some Republicans hope he craves, Pence, now in his third year ...

Robert Reich: The share-the-scraps economy

How would you like to live in an economy where robots do everything that can be predictably programmed in advance, and almost all profits go to the robots' owners? Meanwhile, human beings do the work that's unpredictable -- odd jobs, on-call projects, fetching and fixing, driving and ...

Froma Harrop: Should economic policy include a senior discount?

We've seen senior discounts for buses. We've seen senior discounts at movie theaters. We've seen senior discounts in supermarkets. Most make some sense, helping businesses attract older customers at slow times when others are working. What makes no sense whatsoever is applying senior ...

Leonard Pitts Jr.: Brian Williams’ lies worse than Fox’s

There's this speech I give my students. Distilled, it goes like this. "Your primary asset as a journalist is not your dogged curiosity, your talent for research or your ability to make prose sing on deadline. No, your one indispensable asset is your credibility. If you are not believable, ...