Lego challenge

The Page Public Library in Luray will host a Lego STEM challenge from 4 to 5 p.m. Thursday for kids in kindergarten through fifth grade.

Parks/Rec

Friday is the deadline to register for Kool Keys, a beginner four-lesson piano class sponsored by Warren County Parks and Recreation. The class will be held Saturdays through Feb. 9.

Classes will be broken into two age groups, 6-7-year-olds will meet from 11 to 11:45 a.m. and 8-10-year-olds will meet from 10 to 10:45 a.m. The cost is $75 per student. Information, registration: Barbara Stepp at 540-635-1919 or email barbara@skylinepiano.com.

Film

Corhaven Graveyard, a preserved burial ground for African Americans enslaved on an antebellum plantation in Shenandoah County, will show the film “Race,” a sports drama about gold-medalist Jesse Owens, from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday in Quicksburg.

Information: Sarah Kohrs at 540-434-933-2029 or email senkokrs@gmail.com.

Quilts

The Apple Valley Needle Threaders Quilt Guild will meet from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Sunday at the Clarke County Parks and Recreation Center, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville.

The guest speaker will be Mary Holton Robare, a researcher, author and lecturer on historical textiles made by the members of the Religious Society of Friends.

Orientation

Sustainability Matters will hold a volunteer orientation at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the State Arboretum at Blandy Farm near Boyce. Information: sustainabilitymattersva@gmail.com.

College news

Kirsten Hernandez, of Bluemont, was named to the dean's list at Lehigh University for the fall semester.

The following students at Bob Jones University have been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester:

Ian Dyke, a senior English education major, of Front Royal.

Samuel Gunther, a freshman composite social studies education major, of Woodstock.

Ashley published

Heather Ashley, a technology teacher at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Strasburg, has been published in the November issue of The Education Digest, a national education publication. Her article is titled “Hour of Code Demystified.”

Ashley’s article, which first appeared as a feature story in the Virginia Journal of Education, provides plans for teachers from all subject areas to participate in the National Hour of Code during December.

This is the second article The Education Digest has published. “Don’t Get Trapped by Social Media” first appeared in the VEA Journal in 2014.

Ashley, a graduate of Strasburg High School, holds a bachelor’s degree in English literature from Mary Baldwin College and a Master’s degree in computers from Shenandoah University. She has taught in Shenandoah County for 22 years.

Education blog

Shenandoah County Public School teacher Donna Shrum was invited to contribute to Larry Ferlazzo’s advice blog for Education Week.

Shrum, a consultant for the Shenandoah Valley Writing Project, was sent a list of future blog topics and was asked to write on any three. The first topic “What are the best ways to give students feedback on their writing?” appeared this month.

In the past eight years, Shrum has become a regular contributor to Georgia Backroads and Country Roads magazines. Her first big publication was about actor Paul Robeson’s influence on Willa Cather. It was published while she was teaching Willa Cather studies at James Madison University.

Shrum, who has taught English at James Madison University, Lord Fairfax Community College, Stonewall Jackson High School, Massanutten Regional Governor’s School and North Fork Middle School, teaches World History and Geography I at Central High School.

Ferlazzo, the author of eight books on education, is a grand-prize winner of the International Reading Association Award for Technology and Reading. He writes a weekly post for the New York Times and has articles on education policy regularly appear in the Washington Post. He teaches English, social studies, and international baccalaureate classes to English language learners and mainstream students at Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento, California.

Lions club

The Basye-Bryce Mountain Lions Club marked its 20th year of distributing holiday food baskets for those in need.

This year the club provided food with a value of almost $11,000 to local families. Thanksgiving baskets were delivered to 48 families, and Christmas baskets were delivered to 58 families. Each of the baskets contained a ham or turkey, a pie and non-perishable items.

In addition to the food basket program, club members contributed over 50 hours this holiday season ringing the Salvation Army bell at local Walmart stores.

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