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Columnists

Mark Shields: Early returns from Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio – How important politically is Ohio? Of the nation's first 10 Republican presidents, seven of them – from Ulysses S. Grant to Warren G. Harding – were native sons of Ohio. In fact, no Republican has ever won the White House who did not first carry Ohio. And in the most ...

Kathleen Parker: The pathology of Trump-itis

WASHINGTON -- Surely he's finally gone and done it now. Donald Trump, insulter extraordinaire, was bound to cross a line too far. Two days before Thanksgiving, he made many people feel nostalgic for the merely obnoxious Trump when he mocked a reporter with a physical disability, displaying a ...

Diane Dimond: Suggestions on controlling the terrorist infestation

My friend Nancy and I were talking the other day about the terrorist attacks in Paris. Nancy, you should know, is retired law enforcement and one of the most interesting thinkers I know. She has a way of cutting through all the bull to get right to the heart of an issue. The Muslim ...

George F. Will: Chris Christie’s serious political talent

WASHINGTON -- Paris was for all Americans, but especially for Republicans, a summons to seriousness that should have two immediate impacts on the Republican presidential contest. It should awaken the party's nominating electorate from its reveries about treating the presidency as an entry-level ...

Leonard Pitts Jr.: Fear leads to shredded right

"Let's stop worrying about people's rights." Sadly there are dozens of junctures in American history from which that shameful quote might spring. It could date as far back as 1798 when President Adams signed the Alien and Sedition Acts, making it illegal to criticize the U.S. ...

Robert B. Reich: The perils of circus politics

The next president of the United States will confront a virulent jihadist threat, mounting effects of climate change, and an economy becoming ever more unequal. We're going to need an especially wise and able leader. Yet our process for choosing that person is a circus, and several ...

Lawrence Kudlow: If we want to destroy ISIS, we can

Let's say it loud and often. If we want to destroy ISIS, we can destroy ISIS. Perhaps I am stating the obvious, but I want to state it anyway. Why? Because I am not hearing it enough. I'm certainly not hearing it from the White House, where the original goal of destruction is barely ...

Kathleen Parker: Crazy is as crazy does

WASHINGTON -- One week, Beirut and Paris; the next week, Mali. The nightmare is young. Where next? The pace and threat of terror seem to have picked up, each incident feeding on the previous. Fear takes hold, momentum builds. Rhetoric flies in the face of reason, until all reason abandons ...

Froma Harrop: A tale of two terrors: Paris and New York

Like most people, I'm thinking of the terrorist trauma in Paris, though with a somewhat different perspective. I was in New York on Sept. 11, 2001, and my thoughts go in this direction: What is the future of cities in which psychopaths have killed crowds of bystanders? In New York, the ...

Marino de Medici: The new face of Europe

The “Schengen Fortress.” This is the moniker that is being given to the new face of Europe brought about by the Islamist terror. Schengen is familiar to those Americans traveling to Europe as the border arrangement that allows them to travel freely almost everywhere on the old continent ...

George F. Will: Freedom of speech includes talking about pets

WASHINGTON -- Never has American freedom of speech been attacked so flagrantly, promiscuously and on so many fronts. The most egregious examples come from campuses and Congress. On campuses, censorship proliferates as political advocacy is confined to designated spaces. In Congress, 54 ...

Scott Rasmussen: Events, not politics, in control

Two items in the news this week highlighted a reality that politicians hate to admit. While they pretend to lead the nation, they are not in charge. The first event, of course, was the attack on Paris. The horror and shock has dominated the public dialogue from the moment it took place. It ...

Connie Schultz: John Kasich and Matthew 25, revisited

This is Republican Gov. John Kasich explaining in March why he expanded coverage for Ohio's Medicaid recipients: "The conservative movement -- a big chunk of which is faith-based -- seems to have never read Matthew 25. ... There's so much we have to do to clean ourselves up. ... So instead ...

Kathleen Parker: Fear and loathing in America

WASHINGTON -- We shouldn't be surprised that many Americans fear the fresh arrival of Syrian refugees in the wake of last week's Paris slaughter by jihadists, including at least one who appears to have entered Europe posing as a refugee. It's pretty natural. Horrified by the savagery ...

Leonard Pitts Jr.: Paris, the City of Light

"I believe the light that shines on you will shine on you forever ... though I can't guarantee there's nothing scary hiding under your bed." - "Father and Daughter" by Paul Simon. My wife has a bad knee and isn't much for long walks, so that night after the Chunnel train had brought us over ...

Mark Shields: Henry Hyde and the 2016 GOP race

Yes, it is true that, as a political reporter, you do find yourself liking some people you cover a lot more than you like others. For example, in my 50 years in Washington, of all the House members I have met, the late Henry Hyde -- a conservative Illinois Republican probably most widely ...

Jonah Goldberg: Obama stubbornly sticks to script on Islamic State

According to legend, if not actual historians, Harold Macmillan was once asked what he most feared could derail his agenda. The British prime minister allegedly said, "Events, my dear boy, events." Macmillan may never have actually said it, but the quote endures because it gets at a ...

Rich Lowry: After Paris, some empty symbolism

The instant online symbol of global support for Paris after last week's attacks was a roughly rendered peace symbol with an Eiffel Tower in the middle of it. The French designer Jean Jullien sketched it as soon as he heard the news of the atrocity. He called it "Peace for Paris," and it ...

Froma Harrop: The Paris attacks and what must change

Many French people referred to the January attacks on the offices of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and other sites as their 9/11. As awful as that time was, it was not a 9/11. Seventeen people died that day. The Sept. 11, 2001, assaults on New York and Washington left nearly 3,000 dead, ...